Category Archives: Communication

Let’s Talk Children’s Mental Health Wellness

Today is National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day. I am participating in national campaign activities as one of the panelists discussing the importance of communication among families, primary care providers and behavioral health specialists. I am honored to be able to share my voice and passion about this topic tonight.  Check out the event, which will be streamed live at 7:00 pm ET at https://nvite.com/HeroesofHope/gxlr3n. Helping families, providers and the larger medical team (including child care providers and schools) be

No more bystanders: Parent tips for creating the change post-election

Like many of you in the months leading up to the election and now post-election, I have experienced a wide range of emotions. However, I am not writing this post because I want to complain about the election and focus on who won or who lost. Nor am I writing this because I am a “sore loser”. I am writing this because I am saddened by what is happening in our country. So much hate and anger. As a behavioral

New tools help doctors coach families on healthy media diets

I just attended a 4.5 hour session hearing from some of the leading experts in the field of media use and children. All the speakers were insightful and engaging…plus to they shared some very practical tips and strategies! Today the AAP released updated guidelines on children’s media use, called Media and Young Minds. What I love is that all the new and ongoing research is being integrated into timely guidelines for general pediatricians, family physicians and pediatric providers…so that we

Why exposures like domestic violence & trauma are important to ask about

As a behavioral pediatrician, I see children with behavior problems.  Kids with aggression, kids who have been kicked out of multiple daycares or schools, and kids who are not doing well at home or school. One of the things I always look for are clues as to WHY. Behaviors, while stressful, are not a diagnosis. They are symptoms of something else. For example: Just because a kiddo is not completing homework or cannot pay attention…it does not automatically mean the child has

What is Health Literacy?

“Health Literacy” refers to the degree to which a person obtains, thinks through and understands basic health information and services needed to make appropriate decisions.  It is influenced by how medical personnel share information with patients and also how families communicate their needs and questions. It also is dependent on one’s knowledge about the health topic and cultural background.  Basically, being health literate translates to being able to fully engaged in one’s healthcare–navigating the system, adequately sharing concerns and health